Friday, April 4, 2014

Campaign to Protect the Woodlands: Update

Our campaign to protect these natural woodlands is coming down to the wire - and it's close... With our creative fundraising of loans, the 360, TNSF (The Nature School Foundation) private stock and the crowd funding site, we have almost reached our goal so the sellers gave us two weeks with 10 days now to go. So we are all full speed now and I ask everyone to think once more about who might have some savings they would like to use in a good way secured by the great value of this property.

For information on loans email Donna – circleway@gmail.com

For a bit of history on the project see the Longer History post from last month.

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

The More Beautiful World Our Hearts Tell Us Is Possible

I awoke this morning just bursting with love. Overflowing, like a fountain. Love for you. Love for our family, our circle. Love for life, for this Earth and all creatures.

I’m looking at my schedule, eagerly planning and thinking of when I may see you again and how we may meet, at least like this, electronically, wherever we are. How I want to hear about your life and understand better how I may help you – help you to make your life more wonderful, more full of love and of joy. How to excite the dreams and the hope in you and in all of us.

Here is my way to do that today. A vision, a dream, a promise of tomorrow.

We have been separated so long we are numbed by the pain of it. But all over the world people are beginning to realize that it is isolation that is the cause of all our suffering, the cause of the fear that smothers our love, the cause of war and violence, of oppression and cruelty, greed and poverty, crime and punishment. Where this is happening, in all the circles where we come together to listen to each other’s loves and fears, we are entering a new age – an Age of Reunion.

“I cannot predict how the Age of Reunion will unfold in linear time. I do know, however, that by the end of our lifetimes, my generation will live in a world unimaginably more beautiful than the one we were born into. And it will be a world that is palpably improving year after year. We will reforest the Greek isles, denuded over two thousand years ago. We will restore the Sahara Desert to the rich grassland it once was. Prisons will no longer exist, and violence will be a rarity. Work will be about, ‘How may I best give of my gifts?’ instead of, ‘How can I make a living?’ Crossing a national border will be an experience of being welcomed, not examined. Mines and quarries will barely exist, as we reuse the vast accumulation of materials from the industrial age. We will live in dwellings that are extensions of ourselves, eat food grown by people who know us, and use articles that are the best that people in the full flow of their talents could make them.  We will live in a richness of intimacy and community that hardly exists today, that we know, because of longing in the heart, must exist. And most of the time, the loudest noises we hear will be the sound of nature and the laughter of children.”

The above words in quotation marks are not mine, although you will recognize me in every thought, and I know you will also recognize yourself there as well, because you all write to me and tell me I am saying just what you are also thinking and feeling. 

This quotation is from a writer named Charles Eisenstein whom I recommend to your immediate attention - visit him at www.charleseisenstein.net. Eisenstein has licensed his writings under what is called a Creative Commons copyright. That means it is free for anyone to reprint with credit to the author, but not for sale or to endorse anything for sale.  It is a model of the Sacred Economics he describes in his book of the same name.

Those words are from the conclusion of that book, “The More Beautiful World Our Hearts Tell Us Is Possible,” which is also the title of his latest book. Read that passage again, savor it, talk with your beloveds about it, weep over it, laugh over it, print it and frame it, send it to everyone you know with the thought, This is where we are all going –together.

Because TOGETHER THERE IS NOTHING WE CANNOT DO. - Manitonquat

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Brief Updates and Longer History

1. UPDATES: It is still happening! You all have been responding to this great opportunity -  some with whatever donation you could scrape together and some for the chance to earn  6% interest on a loan to realize a beautiful dream. I want to thank everyone of you from my heart for all your prayers as well as your loans and gifts. So many are responding it is keeping us up late. But more is still needed – we have an new extension now until March 31st April 14th, so we still can make it but time is short.

We need to spread the word further now. Ask everyone you know to ask everyone they know to ask everyone they know; put it on Facebook and Twitter. Make circles and brainstorm; make flier as post them in public places; write letters to newspapers. Stir the excitement that people can actually make money and do real good in this world right now. A loan of 1,000 will earn 60 more in a year, of 10,000 will earn 600, of 100,000 will earn 6,000.

For information on loans email Donna – circleway@gmail.com

2. HISTORY: For any of you who may be interested in knowing more, here is the history of this project and our dreams and plans for its future.

In May of 1978 fifty people came together on this land responding to a poster that read “Have You Lost Your Tribe?” In the Great Hall we had hung a banner that read
ON US WE TRUST. They came from all over New England and shared their dreams of a better life and fell in love with each other.

That night I had a dream in my sleep that we really did all live together, that we were a small tribe and the name of the tribe was Mettanokit – “Our Mother Earth.” A group of us did at last come together to live on this land, calling ourselves the Mettanokit Community and became part of the Federation of Egalitarian Communities nationally and the New England Network of Light locally. Mettanokit continued th ework of Another Place, presenting alternative education and healing seminars such as the annual New England Healing Arts Fair and the annual Northeastern Communities Conference, and also created programs in many New England Prisons.

Thirty acres of Another Place land had been sold before we moved in to help pay down the huge debt previously accrued by Another Place. Within a decade our new community was able to pay off the mortgage and the rest of that debt. Later, in the 90s, a great fire, probably from sparks landing from a chimney on the roof, made the Main House uninhabitable. We had not examined the fire insurance we had continued from the prior management, and now found it too small to fund rebuilding.The last of the community was disbanded, but Ellika and I continued living in our small house in the woods, continued the prison programs and to hold circles and gatherings. The Nature School of Massachuetts bought the property and agreed to allow Ellika and me to live out our lives in our little house while we continued to expand our Circle Way teachings in Europe for half of every year.

Then the adjacent property which had been sold became for sale again, now with a fine ecological house and garage a pond, several gardens and fruit trees and natural woodlands that we want to preserve. There we could immediately begin again the work of an educational-healing retreat center. Our plans also include rehabilitation of the Nature School property nearby in Mason, and the growth of an ecovillage to support and carry on the educational and healing activities on both properties.

For thirty-three years I have lived in my little Birch Cottage in the woods, hand build b y our old Mettanokit Community. There our only neighbors are the wild creatures – the raccoons that one year moved into our attic, the porcupines that mad love under our bedroom and made babies that grew and return to have more babies every year, the red squirrels that invade our cabinets, the flying squirrels that lived in our closet, the mice that brought toilet paper to make nests behind the books at the top of our shelves, the wild turkeys that sometimes troupe by our sundeck traversing our hill, the partridge that used to chase my car up the drive away from her babies, the deer we sometimes glimpse at twilight, the moose, the foxes in their hole, the pair of otters that swam through our pond on their way to the beaver pond below our hill, the bobcats we sometimes hear at night, the rabbits only known by their footprints in the new snow, the chorus of the frogs when the streams overflow in spring, and the many birds that visit our feeders on their migrations.

If the woods around us are cut down for commercial development, where will they go, all these friends of ours?

Our plans for this property if we are able to secure it, besides creating the educational-healing retreat center there, are to make a nature trail through the woods for the school, a trail that will be ope to everyone and an attraction to the area. We have dreamed of a museum that will include a collection of native artifacts I inherited from my Wampanoag grandfather, a model native village displaying various types of constructions from diverse tribal areas, and a shop for native and local crafts and artwork.

At the Nature School we plan courses on how to teach about nature and good environmental practices, and to teach the Circle Way of inclusion and mutual support in creating the kind of lives, relationships, communities and society that we want – ones not based on money and financial gain but on love, and joy in each other and in our children, in the wonders of life an the world, in fun and play, in creativity and interesting work and study, a world in which every human being can travel anywhere in freedom and peace and be welcomed with hospitality and pleasure. In ecovillages everywhere we can model the way human beings can live together in harmony, supporting each other and creating a more huma world for and with our children.

Monday, March 17, 2014

Notes from and Elder

One thing about getting old, your perspective broadens. You don’t get so waylaid by all the small daily intrusions as you used to be. You are offered a larger view.

It’s an interesting mix. A lot of the time you are confused, don’t remember what you did or intended a moment ago. Then memories from the distant past burst into your consciousness, which is mostly pleasant but disorienting.

That’s why the conversation of us old geezers can be so exasperating to everyone else. We complain about our aches and new pains, we are always asking, “Where is my…?” “Has anybody seen my…?” or we are nattering on about old times pointlessly.

I see all that in myself, but also I experience periods of great clarity and deeper, broader understanding of the human predicament that includes us all at this moment of history.

I am writing to you and the world from that clarity and understanding as much as I can these days for as long as my energy lasts. It seems a shame how that energy wanes more and more, but I must accept that.


The wisdom mined by others can make great contributions to our understanding and our actions. We would do well to refresh the wisdom handed down from Lao Tse, from the Buddha, or from Jesus to inform our steps at all times. But not all of what is retain from former times is germane and helpful to our present conditions. New thinking is always necessary.

Recent and contemporary figures have given us great examples to guide us – Gandhi’s non-violent resistance to oppression, Tutu’s truth and reconciliation events, the ongoing movements for peace, environmental healing, restorative justice, to eradicate poverty and provide basic needs of health and freedom to all human beings – all these are alive and growing, and we all benefit from our attendance on them.


Compassion, a basic human attribute, languishes in us because of our isolation and anxiety. Children raised with closeness and affection are naturally caring. We need a society where the highest goals offered are not material wealth, notoriety, or power over others, but the rich pleasures of the human heart and mind. An economy based not on getting but on giving, the gifts of Earth’s resources not appropriated for possession but for the pleasures of mutual benefit, of sharing, of helping, of healing.

Emphasizing the traditional wisdom of the Buddha, the Dalai Lama advises our intentions always towards compassion and tells us, “Never give up!” Also from the Buddhist tradition of mindfulness, the teacher Thich Nhat Hanh tell us to listen, listen deeply, listen to each other, listen to ourselves, listen to life.

And in developing the techniques for non -violent communication Marshal Rosenberg offers a marvelous question I urge myself and everyone to ask each other: How can I help you make your life more wonderful?”


Now if everyone who reads these words would only say “Yes!” and put them all to work every moment, the human situation would get better the more people are able to read them, and our job is only to spread the words further.

But reading is not enough. The activities around us that produce anxiety and fear, increase isolation and loneliness, and reduce compassion and closeness must be prevented. These activities, you have perhaps noticed, are enforced by our economic and political systems and the anxiety and fear generated by them.

We have enough history now to affirm clearly that the overthrow of these systems does not create the human society we seek. The fears and greed and lust for power over others continue and corrupt whatever we may try to replace that system with. We need protected breeding grounds for a truly human society. That can happen without threatening or confronting others with hostility.

It is in fact happening, peaceably, more and more. People are gathering to live together in a better relationship to the Earth, to all life, to each other and to themselves. I have been working with such communities, now generally calling themselves ecovillages, for over 40 years. Are they perfect? Of course not. But life there is certainly far better, far happier, freer, more creative and satisfying than any place, any place outside them. More satisfying also than that of the poor, the struggling, the isolated, and also than that of the rich, the one percent in their gated communities.

These ecoovillages are laboratories, experiments in creating a new world, where they are trying to work out all the kinks and make life more wonderful for everyone. I invite you all to look into them more – check out Tamera, ZEGG, Damanhur, Findhorn, The Farm, to name only a few – there are thousands of others.

We have been experimenting on our own, working out techniques for getting the kinks out, the stuff we keep dragging with us from the old systems, stuff that is getting in our way, in the way of our compassion and our joy.

The original basis for our social thinking is that of the successful communities of all our past human history. We have named it The Circle Way and have been exploring it in workshops and camps for 30 years, learning more every time we come together. The major tool we are honing we call Supportive Listening, adapted from co-counseling for use in our circles and in the wider world.

The Circle Way is centered on all of us, not on any teacher or writing, or even on any policy. Centered on us, it can change as we change – and no one knows for sure how we will change and what the effects of that change will be. Writing like this will go into the archives and be noted as part of our history an growth, as we check out the thoughts and times of the Buddha and Jesus, of Gandhi and thousands of others like me experiencing and writing about these changes today, people like Joanna Macy and Starhawk and Jean Houston, like Steven Gaskin and Thich Nhat Hanh and…really thousands, it’s true. But all that writing is just smoke unless people are actively living it, as they are trying to do in the ecovillages.

The Circle Way understands that – as my late friend Pete Seeger put it, “None of us will get there unless we all get there.” And that means we have to be listening to each one. We can’t listen to each one in groups of thousands or even hundreds. We have to be in circles where EACH ONE can be heard by all.

If a circle is too big for everyone to listen to each other in a reasonable period that they can all sit still for, the circle must be broken down into smaller circles. Those are our basic communities, but those circles can connect to cooperate with larger circles to work on mutual interests together. Always we must keep in mind human scale. We can make our circles more efficient by continually taking time out for smaller circles of two people or three, where we can get clear our best communications to the larger circle.


Two signs we can print or just remember:

NONE OF US IS AS SMART AS ALL OF US.
And
IN US WE TRUST.


That last one comes from our certainty we were, like every baby, born good and innocent, eager, curious - loving closeness, play, laughter, creativity, and liking to help, enjoying cooperation and to be welcome, to be accepted, understood and appreciated. Together we can help each other to be who we were born to be.


So you see, I really do know how to change the world. I know how to help you, everyone, make life more wonderful for yourself and for all life. But it’s not something I can do by myself. Not even by writing it all down. Because it can only happen when we actually do it.  That means do it together. None of us can do it alone. We need each other.

That is why I am urging you to get together, make circles, listen to each other. And then bring it to the Earth. Settle, as people always have, together on a piece of land, listen to one another and support one another, trust in your goodness and intelligence and thoughtfulness and use Supportive Listening to help each other clear out all that gets in the way of your love and compassion, your clarity and creativity and joy.

I am urging this for NOW. Because really, you may think you can wait, but I don’t have as much time as you. I want to live with you now and be close and play with our children and grandchildren, and work and sing and dance together, and show the world how it is done.

My late friend Mort Goulder liked the model in my book Changing the World, but asked, “How do we get there from here?”  Fate has placed an immediate possibility in our hands, to buy our neighbor’s property and right away start a seminar/healing/retreat center where a supporting ecovillage can grow.  But we have to act quickly.  We could do it if we got some large loans that would earn a good income for the donors, and/or it could work if we got tens of thousands, maybe a hundred thousand small donations.  I assume you, like me, do not have a large amount to invest, but you do have friends who, like you, could pass on this information to others and ask them to pass it on through the Internet and all the social networks. 

We need a mass movement – It can start here.  Never give up.

TOGETHER THERE IS NOTHING WE CANNOT DO. To all who make a donation we can send a certificate that they are founding members of our Circle Way Retreat Center and will be welcome to visit any time.

Friday, March 7, 2014

Spreading the Word, Preserving the Land

Okay folks - I am going to assume that you are reading this blog because you have intersected with us and The Circle Way at some time and you liked our way of wanting to change the world into something more human, something that helps everyone by us getting closer and all helping one another. If that's not why you are here - well, enjoy and stay close anyway.

If you want to help change the world with us there are a few simple things you can do.

The first is share and/or donate to our crowdfunding campaign to support the Circle Way Ecovillage USA.

The crowdfunding campaign is part of our effort to raise money to purchase the land north and west of us. On this land there is a lovely house and garage, a beautiful pond, a permaculture orchard, organic garden, and landscaped meditation garden. I dread to see it bulldozed for a crowded development of houses and the forest clear-cut and harvested. If we can purchase the land we will be able to immediately begin to hold Circle Way seminars, healing workshops, and to build a community to sustain the land as a teaching-healing retreat and center for all people.

The land and everything on it is worth much more than what is being asked but still Ellika and I do not have the money ourselves to buy it, although we have given all we have as a non-refundable deposit to hold it for now.

Many people have already responded to our call promising help, and many more are beginning to hear about it through Facebook but we have still not reached our goal. Every one of you who can donate and share the page on your Facebook can make a big difference. Every donation helps, no matter how small, and if you can't donate, spread the word.

The second also very simple thing I encourage anyone to do is write a positive review of any of my books on Amazon.com. I can attest that those reviews really work - I never buy anything from Amazon without reading them and they definitely influence my decision.

If you want to contribute more in depth there are some some tools for you on the website. Some promotional letters which you can use to contact people, feel free to change any of them as you feel or redo completely in your own words and think of other possibilities.

With deepest affection, Manitonquat

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Farewell to Pete Seeger

Dear Friends,

If you have not yet heard, my friend Pete Seeger passed on to his last journey from this world yesterday.  He was a good friend to all native people (Floyd Westerman also appeared with me telling stories at Pete's Clearwater Revivals) and for nine decades a singer, storyteller, fighter for working people, for equality, justice, peace and a healthy planet. In his song “To my Old Brown Earth”, Pete asked us not to cry, but you and I know that crying is a good and healing thing that allows our feeling our strong and deep emotions. The words of Ecclesiastes that he set to music say that there is a time to mourn, and we may take time for that now.  Sadness is important also to share.

It was not unexpected, of course.  When I visited them last spring Toshi was much reduced and Pete was taking pains to include her in our conversation but it was clear that dear sharp energetic Toshi would not be long with us.  And that would mean, of course, that after 70 years together, their lives being so entwined, neither would care to hang out very much longer without the other half.

The occasion of my visit was to give them my latest book Have You Lost Your Tribe? because of the brief memory of Pete I included at the end of the chapter on “The Rainbow Tribe.”  I left soon, not wishing to take up their time together, and I doubt now if Pete even had the time to check out that part because I failed to mark it.

Now I am realizing that I spend quite a bit of my free musing time in writing letters to them in my head, explaining what I am doing and telling them how their example has helped to fuel the work with people that Ellika and I do.  Not wanting to add to the great volume of correspondence that they would be receiving, I actually sent those thoughts very seldom and visited even less.  And of course after the fine memorial for Toshi at Ethical Culture I have been thinking to check in once more with Pete but this time put it off too long.

My friendship with Pete Seeger began 38 years ago at a one of his concerts (I know the time because my oldest son was in his mother’s womb at that concert and when Pete played the banjo she said Tokeem was dancing!) my old friend David Amram introduced us, and the first thing Pete said to me was how much he loved Indians when he was a boy.  I stayed in touch during my tenure as an editor of Akwesasne Notes and when we formed a community in New Hampshire later our whole community would go to the Clearwater Revivals to do the recycling while I was telling stories at Story Point.

Following my elders advice to go wherever I was invited, my path led me to Europe, where I met Ellika and most of you who are reading this have kept our connection through community building camps and family camps that we have led for 30 years, now in 12 countries.  Most of you have watched as I showed Pete’s story, The Power of Song, and you know what an inspiration he has been to me for maybe 60 years.  You have heard me say that his integrity and unflagging zeal for peace and justice and compassion, for the Earth and all our animal and plant relatives was unequaled by any public person in America.  He did not care to sing solo but always enjoined all present to song together, and his attitude was encapsulated in his remarks that we must change the end of “Over the Rainbow” to remind us that none of us will get to our vision of a world fit for humankind until all of us can go together –“If happy little bluebirds fly beyond the Rainbow, why can’t you and I.”

As you all know, I am just 10 years younger than Pete, and I really hope I have another 10 years in me because our community building is only just really getting started and I have at least another 10 books to write and add to the 10 I have perpetrated already.  I am slower, but I will keep traveling until I have to stop and let you come to me.  Lucky I am to have Ellika to hold me up and keep me in line – as I say in a poem to her, ,”insisting on vegetables and seat-belts.”

So wherever you are now, join in a chorus of Pete’s that we often sing together:

One blue sky above us, one ocean lapping all our shores,
One Earth, so green and round, who could ask for more?
And because we love you, let’s give it one more try
To show our Rainbow Race, it’s too soon to die.

And as we remember Pete, recall his belief that the human race has a 50/50 chance of having a human race here in a hundred years, that the scales are evenly balanced and one grain might tip them in either direction, and that we are, all of us but one grain - we must all be involved and get active in some way.

And listen once more to the farewell of his last song:

Guard well our human chain,
Watch well you keep it strong,
As long as sun shall shine.

And this our home,
Be pure and sweet and green,
For now I’m yours,
And you are also mine.

Be Well – I love you all,
TOGETHER THERE IS NOTHING WE CANNOT DO
Medicine Story

ps I attach a photo from the last time we visited - a model for us of a couple who showed us all not by teaching but by doing -and that courage is not something we are born with but something we choose, a decision we can continually make.


Monday, January 6, 2014

Learning from indigenous wisdom and knowledge


A summary of this year's Irish camp by R. Teichmann: Learning from indigenous wisdom and knowledge – To change society a cultural revolution in activism is needed.

I recently attended a workshop with an Elder of the Wampanoag Nation, Manitonquat (Medicine Story). This article is my personal “digestion” of that weekend. I dedicate this to all fellow men and women who hold a vision for a better future and are working towards reaching that goal and especially to Manitonquat and his partner Ellika.